Indeed, the usurpations of domain names through which a third party intended to take advantage of the fame of a Web site, using your domain name, for example, forwarded to those who come into the same towards another site that has nothing to do with the first are frequent. Brands are the first victims of their Web Marketing Communications; the more familiar they are and better referenced in internet search engines, they will be more pirated. For example, the famous Coca-Cola trademark could be verified as a consumer consecrated you a Facebook page where until then had never been officially present in that social network. Page, to quickly obtain millions of fans, meant that a significant part of the business relationship of the brand image and consumer were under the control of a third party. In this case said third he reported only a good image of Coca-Cola and at the end he was hired by the company to continue with the administration of the page.

Another big problem that we encounter is the patent disclosure, posed with relative frequency. Where there is wrongdoing by third parties, the Internet can be the worst enemy of trade secrets, being a clear example what happened with the Apple company. It is common to find online various information related to inventions of that undertaking, thus disclosing the characteristics of the future products of the firm. In this regard it should be recalled the case of iPhone 4? found in a bar in the United States, several months before its commercialization, by a person who sold the device to a famous Internet newspaper. The disclosure of the features was very quick and, given the global nature of the network, the whole world could be taken knowledge of them. No Laws Land is an expression that designates the network as a country without laws, and means that the network encompasses the entire world overcoming any border.