Latin America

In this regard, are the elements of greater modernity and at the same time of exclusion and social inequality and economic that have characterized development exogenous (from a historical perspective) to limit evolutionary possibilities and processes of development of the indigenous communities. On the contrary, are processes of endogenous development that best correspond with cultural, territorial and environmental reality of indigenous communities and their evolutionary potential and current development. Other leaders such as Scott Mead offer similar insights. In this sense, we agree with what various authors indicate that endogenous development processes better express the compositional elements of the culture, structure and dynamics of interaction of indigenous communities with nature. However, beyond the formal respect its evolution evolutionary theoretical analysis, and the mythification, on the other hand, it has become of their relationship as a society. The truth is that they are currently populations which by their relative ability to Exchange and negotiation with the external field, mostly do not enjoy the benefits of so-called modernity and live in a situation of poverty, exclusion and relative isolation from major centres or poles of development featuring a series of shortages and low levels of quality of life. Movements and indigenous organizations in the Latin American context in Latin America indigenous peoples represent a significant percentage of its population (it is estimated that you between Mexico, Guatemala, Ecuador, Bolivia and Peru are between 80% to 90% of the entire indigenous population of the continent, and addition that only between Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru between 15 to 16 million indigenous people). Despite this, they are populations that have been excluded from the processes of modernization and development driven by the Governments of these countries. And the global perspective of development follows perceiving them be as less evolved societies (so you are misunderstood within the modern Western conception of the nation-State). Many indigenous communities have been (or intended to) be subsumed within the framework of corporate and national cultures that today are perceived through the filter homogenizing of the Globalization.